California, we’re so big and mighty…welcome to the 1st Third-World State of America, 38.3 million slaves and growing!

Why do you all love this overpopulated shoehorn of cartographic feces so much?

Do you really enjoy spending so much money just to rub shoulders with other like-minded masses of intolerable materialists and consumerist sheep?

Oh yeah…of course you do.

Let’s see if we can hit 40 million. We can do it! Si se puede!

California’s population rises to 38.3 million during 2013

Fueled by robust growth in the San Francisco Bay Area, California’s population continued its slow, steady ascent last year, adding 1,000 residents each day in 2013 to bring the number of people in the nation’s largest state to 38.3 million.

The report also illustrated California’s efforts to keep pace with housing stock, said Doug Kuczynski, a state research program specialist. The state added 59,426 housing units in 2013, compared with a net increase in 2012 of 45,367 units — a 31% higher growth rate.
Increasingly, fewer of those units are single-family homes, and more of them are in multi-family complexes such as apartment buildings, Kuczynski said.
Los Angeles added more units — more than 7,000 — than any other city. But all of that net growth was in multi-family units; in 2013, Los Angeles demolished more single-family homes than it built, Kuczynski said. San Francisco added 2,377 housing units, just 24 of which were single-family homes.

The report also illustrated California’s efforts to keep pace with housing stock, said Doug Kuczynski, a state research program specialist. The state added 59,426 housing units in 2013, compared with a net increase in 2012 of 45,367 units — a 31% higher growth rate.
Increasingly, fewer of those units are single-family homes, and more of them are in multi-family complexes such as apartment buildings, Kuczynski said.
Los Angeles added more units — more than 7,000 — than any other city. But all of that net growth was in multi-family units; in 2013, Los Angeles demolished more single-family homes than it built, Kuczynski said. San Francisco added 2,377 housing units, just 24 of which were single-family homes.
“That’s the bulk of the growth,” Kuczynski said. “We expect that to continue.”
Irvine added 11,000 residents in 2013 — the fourth highest increase in the state, despite the fact that it is not one of California’s larger cities. Irvine added the second-most housing units in the state — 4,186 units, more than were added in San Jose, San Diego or San Francisco.
Many of the houses sprouting up around Irvine’s Great Park are marketed to Asians and Asian Americans. FivePoint Communities, a developer, pays close attention to feng shui, an ancient Chinese art designed to balance the flow of energy in a space.
The company plans to build up to 9,500 homes, working with experts to ensure that everything from layout to street names foster a feeling of harmony. “When we choose where to live, we need to focus on something inspirational, desirable,” said Lon Wen, who recently shopped for homes in the new development.
Despite the building boom, demand remains high.
“The competition to buy is insane,” said Kim Madolora, an Irvine resident and mother of two. “Where else can you live with a park at every corner and so many things for kids to do?”
She lauded the city’s low crime rate, its school system and its community spirit — a recent jogathon at her daughter’s elementary school surpassed its $30,000 goal by $16,000. The houses next door and across the street from her home both sold in a day, to cash buyers.
“I have a lot of friends wanting to come here,” she said. “But they can’t get in.”
Mindy Baker, who has five children, arrived in Irvine just over three years ago, needing a good preschool, elementary school, middle school and high school.
“That’s why people choose to come here,” said the transplant from Ontario, Canada.
Her children are now ages 8 to 18. “We have 10 years until our youngest graduates from high school,” she said. “We want to stay.”
The state’s most significant growth took place in the San Francisco Bay Area, where a booming technology sector has helped push unemployment rates to record lows — 5.2% in San Francisco County in March, far below the state rate of 8.4%.

All the dazzling self back-patting and blustery exclusiveness really just illustrates the fact that this state’s class divide is widening further and further, revealing a monstrous hellish chasm that is voraciously swallowing up the remaining traces of a middle class.

The “rah-rah we’re growing” crowd is usually liberal and well-to-do. They love California. They love the pornographic real estate market and the high cost of living because it makes them very “special.” And there is nothing a capitalist tool enjoys more than unqualified financial self-importance.

The rest of the Californians are sick of this top-heavy cesspool and anxiously await escape. Escaping, unfortunately, is not easy.

California is the first uniquely Third-World state of America.

Hopefully nothing short of a bloody revolution will draw its soiled entrails for good into depths of the Pacific Ocean.